timing is everything.

A collection of current work and work-in-progress | jillensley.com

We have six hundred rivers in China, four hundred of which have been killed by pollution," said a Chinese scientist who asked not to be named. "We will have to send at least 300 million people to Africa before we begin to see the end to our problems.
Before & After on Flickr.
Passing ship on the Bei Jiang River, a tributary of the Pearl River.  The woman on the boat ducked down when I tried to take her picture as the boat passed.  China.  May, 2006.

Before & After on Flickr.

Passing ship on the Bei Jiang River, a tributary of the Pearl River.  The woman on the boat ducked down when I tried to take her picture as the boat passed.  China.  May, 2006.

Taken at a Buddhist temple on the banks of the Bei Jiang River, tributary of the Pearl River.  Somewhere between Guangzhou and Lianzhou.
May, 2006. View high resolution

Taken at a Buddhist temple on the banks of the Bei Jiang River, tributary of the Pearl River.  Somewhere between Guangzhou and Lianzhou.

May, 2006.

I’m in the middle of re-editing the video for my China photo book Kickstarter project.

That’s a sentence I kind of want to slap myself for uttering.  Yet, as I sift through hundreds of unseen images, I think this is how it was supposed to be.  Both time and editing skills have increased, and I’m able to see these images in a new light, with some distance and through new eyes.  If you see this, please consider supporting and/or spreading the word.  I am overwhelmed with my desire, my need, to share this with the world.  (Again, kind of want to slap myself.  Still true.)

I was looking for a certain lush photo to post on this anomaly of a day, a Buddhist temple nestled on the banks of the Beijing River, something pretty and a little exotic.  Instead I went digging in the folder I’d called “Unidentified Villages”, and found her.  Something about her gaze.  Something strong, yet peaceful, as if those two fingers mean more than just a gesture.  Imploring, quiet, resolute.  I was even going to crop it further until I noticed the boy’s t-shirt behind her.  True, beautiful children make easy subjects, this could be a poster for any number of peace or humanitarian organizations.  Maybe that’s why I left these alone, this visit to a school in what I seem to recall was Kind Father Village.  But children can speak volumes with intense, small looks and unspoken pleas for the future and she shouldn’t be ignored. 
Happy Leap Day everyone.  It’s a big world out there. View high resolution

I was looking for a certain lush photo to post on this anomaly of a day, a Buddhist temple nestled on the banks of the Beijing River, something pretty and a little exotic.  Instead I went digging in the folder I’d called “Unidentified Villages”, and found her.  Something about her gaze.  Something strong, yet peaceful, as if those two fingers mean more than just a gesture.  Imploring, quiet, resolute.  I was even going to crop it further until I noticed the boy’s t-shirt behind her.  True, beautiful children make easy subjects, this could be a poster for any number of peace or humanitarian organizations.  Maybe that’s why I left these alone, this visit to a school in what I seem to recall was Kind Father Village.  But children can speak volumes with intense, small looks and unspoken pleas for the future and she shouldn’t be ignored. 

Happy Leap Day everyone.  It’s a big world out there.

Sometimes the ache to return is almost unbearable.  But you can’t go back, only forward, possibly returning at a different angle, never re-creating.  Creating, it’s something I need to do more of.  This 9-5, this compound life, these things are slow ruin.
This is the bedroom of the couple who let Avy and I stay in their home in Yao Village, a small community north of Guangzhou (?), China.  I meant to paint it someday, but it may be fine just as it is. View high resolution

Sometimes the ache to return is almost unbearable.  But you can’t go back, only forward, possibly returning at a different angle, never re-creating.  Creating, it’s something I need to do more of.  This 9-5, this compound life, these things are slow ruin.

This is the bedroom of the couple who let Avy and I stay in their home in Yao Village, a small community north of Guangzhou (?), China.  I meant to paint it someday, but it may be fine just as it is.

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